Scarpa North America Blog

Category Archives: Beta

More than a paint job: Scarpa’s Maestrale gets some body work.

Oct. 9th 2012

SCARPA didn’t have to do much to better the Maestrale, a proven balance of uphill ergonomics and downhill capability; its dependable performance has made it the most popular AT boot in SCARPA history. Instead, they took a design that works and gave it a couple simple tweaks. Think of it this way—the new Maestrale RS is essentially the same vehicle as the original, only it has a little more under the hood.

The RS means “Renn Sport” in German, or racing sport. It’s a way of saying they charge on the downhill. The new paint job separates it for sure, but the body of the boot is comprised of Polyamide instead of Pebax, which has a slightly higher strength to weight ratio, giving the RS a 120 flex index (20% advantage) over the original Maestrale’s intitial 100 flex; yet it only adds 1.4oz (40g) in additional weight—about as much as a gel pack.

Two slight alterations in the RS include the Zeus buckles, which help to increase power and cuff closure, and the Predator RS instep heel retention, which provides maximum heel hold and augments the tongue stiffness. Like its predecessor, the RS’s progressive flex provides both sensitivity and power transmission to the ski edges in situations when precision turns are paramount. Because backcountry conditions include the worst as much as the best in snow quality, the additional security of the RS is a welcome addition when you’re staring down a 1000-foot couloir of blower pow—or boilerplate.

Posted in Beta | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Sensitive – it’s the new Strong: Enter SCARPA’s latest Phantom Guide mountain boot

Sep. 11th 2012

Being sensitive doesn’t always mean you’re weak. It can make you aware. It brings certain factors to your attention so that you alter your position, if ever so slightly. It can turn a potentially ugly situation into an opportunity to thrive. SCARPA sees this value, and has taken that mindset into redesigning the Phantom Guide, which has made several advancements that turn “sensitivity” into information the climber can use.

Posted in Beta | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Rottefella NTN Freedom telemark binding hits the streets

Aug. 21st 2012

When the Rotefella NTN (New Telemark Norm)binding came out in 2007, many telemarkers understood the potential for a more powerful system. Some, however, still wanted a lighter binding system, and a system that offered a true free-pivot touring mode (the first version of NTN still had a bit of tension in the system when released to tour mode).

For Fall 2012, Rotefella answers that call with the new NTN Freedom binding, which, at 1 pound 10 ounces per binding (size large) offers an NTN telemark binding that’s right in the realm of the lightest telemark bindings available – 75 mm or otherwise. As well, when switched to tour mode (which is as easy as pulling up a tab on the front of the binding), the system offers almost no resistance when touring. Pair that with a 60-degree range of motion for walking, and NTN offers outstanding touring performance.

Backcountry Magazine’s editors liked what they saw, and what they tested. After lots of time on the binding last spring, just last week they named it one of five bindings to earn their 2013 Editor’s Choice Award.

So, now there are two. The NTN Freedom binding offers … well … freedom for touring in the backcountry, while the original NTN, now called the NTN Freeride binding, offers a burlier, more powerful system for people who are telemarking in area, or who just like to have the more powerful option.

One more point on weight: SCARPA NTN boots are lighter than traditional 75mm Telemark boots. So, SCARPA Terminator X tele boots paired with NTN Freedom bindings set the new standard for lightweight performance for Telemark ski touring. By design, the binding’s dual connection creates a stronger interface between boot and ski, providing more powerful edge to edge responsiveness, while maintaining natural flex and overall driveability.

More simply: Among the lightest on the uphill, paired with category defining performance on the downhill.

Posted in Beta | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Phantom cometh: SCARPA’s Phantom 8000 rises to its name

Aug. 9th 2012

Mother Nature has a tendency to give climbers—literally—the cold shoulder. While many prefer being around her in sunnier dispositions, others do enjoy her good graces through tough love approaches and icier mood swings high in the hills. Having the right tools helps. When frozen ground, bottomless temps and high winds are compulsory, the Phantom 8000, SCARPA’s preeminent high altitude cold weather boot is the standard.

Posted in Beta | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Avoiding problems with rock shoe delamination

Jul. 31st 2012

Finding the right pair of rock shoes takes some time and effort. And buying those that best work for a particular intended purpose isn’t always easy. So it makes sense that when you do get the shoes that work for that particular use or project, you protect your investment.

There really aren’t a lot of preventative measures to taking care of rock shoes, but there are a few. One is simply keeping an eye on normal wear and tear, and – when they need it – getting them to a good cobbler for a resole before too much wear makes that not a possibility. Another is pretty simple: Don’t leave your rock shoes in a hot car (or expose to any type of heat), or even – when possible to avoid it – in direct sunlight.

Posted in Beta | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Setting the Pace: SCARPA’s Moraine Mid GTX moves out front.

Jul. 19th 2012

Women's Moraine Mid GTX

The moment we leave the trailhead we set a pace. It changes as we go up, as we go down, how far we venture, and for how long. It pays to have the proper shoes working in concert with whatever pace we set. With backpacking season coming into full stride this coming August and September SCARPA gives a welcomed nod to their streamlined utility light hiker, the Moraine Mid GTX.

A deft synthetic boot that’s light and nimble for an hour-long outing, but built intelligibly to handle the rigors of a week-long backcountry march, the Moraine Mid GTX is SCARPA’s sophisticated interpretation stealth and strength.

Posted in Beta | Leave a comment

What’s your Tempo? SCARPA’s every day trail running tool

Jun. 19th 2012

Single Track. It’s the muse of the trail runner, slithering, undulating, and leading us not only into the woods but also through our own personal wilderness. Long trail runs can be hypnotizing, and whatever tempo we take, the rewards leave us longing for another day in the hills. SCARPA knows this, hence the Tempo, the all-purpose tool for the trail.

The Tempo belongs to the same family as the award-winning Spark, but its slightly stouter build makes it better equipped for bigger forays into the wilds. Both shoes embody SCARPA’s Mountain Minimal ethos, which strips away excess materials but retains the necessary structural integrity for protective, high performance fit and feel trail running shoes. Think of the Tempo for training, and the Spark for racing.

Posted in Beta | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

SCARPA’s new Boostic rock shoe for all-around high-end climbing

Jun. 12th 2012

It’s good to be an all-arounder. It gives us options —opportunities to better explore our craft. It shows a willingness to adapt, to embrace the unknown, and it keeps us balanced. Legendary climbing shoe designer Heinz Mariacher knows this, which is why he’s made the new Boostic, SCARPA’s latest high-end, do-it-all masterpiece.

The Boostic strives for optimum performance balanced with good comfort, allowing you to climb at your limit with confidence whether bouldering, hard sport climbing or sending personal test pieces.

Posted in Beta | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Blake Herrington: New Routes in Red Rock

Apr. 26th 2012

Blake Herrington has a passion for discovering new climbs. With new routes from Patagonia to Alaska, Herrington, who is based in Washington, has established over two-dozen alpine climbs, all done in a traditional style, ground up, without a single bolt. Below is a video and his account of a day in Red Rock in Nevada, where he and his climbing partner established 1,500′ of new routes.

Mt. Wilson looms impressively above all other peaks and walls in Red Rocks, Nevada. Its satellite pinnacle, Cactus Flower Tower, holds a rarely-climbed summit of its own. In early April, I recruited my friend, Chris Weidner, into joining me in climbing Mt. Wilson and the tower. The plan was to put up a new route on each formation.

Also posted in SCARPA in the field | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Heinz Mariacher and Active Randing in SCARPA rock shoes

Jul. 22nd 2011

“The concept is as easy as nailing a piece of rubber to a barn door,” says Heinz Mariacher, SCARPA’s storied shoe designing prophet, or – more formally – climbing line manager.

But don’t let his casual theorizing about what he calls ‘Active Randing’ fool you. There’s more going on than Mariacher would lead you to believe. After all, the guy’s had a one-track focus on climbing shoes for well over three decades.

So what is Active Randing? And what difference does it make in SCARPA’s rock shoes?

Said (somewhat) simply, Mariacher’s concept of Active Randing employs rubber rands that wrap around the shoe in different configurations (for different types of climbing), designed to support climbers’ feet in the movements critical to climbing at top levels. These active rands are tensioned in ways that engage and disengage to support the foot, storing and re-releasing energy. They dynamically adapt to the foot while it loads and unloads body weight, effectively storing and releasing power—similar to the way a barn door slams shut with a rubber tether.

Visually, you can see it SCARPA’s rock shoes. If you look at, say, a Vapor V or an Instinct, the shoes have structure that makes them look like there’s a foot in them when there isn’t. Active rands give the shoe that structure. They also do a lot more that you can’t see, but you can feel …

Posted in Beta | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment