Scarpa North America Blog

Tag Archives: SCARPA climbing

Blake Herrington’s 4 Tips to Stay Warm in the High Alpine

Sep. 24th 2013

Blake Herrington is an accomplished rock climber, alpinist and contributor to Alpinist, Climbing, and Rock & Ice magazines, among others. He’s established over two dozen new alpine climbs ­– without bolts ­– throughout Patagonia, British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. When not climbing near his home in Leavenworth, Washington, Herrigton is jumping borders and hopping planes in search of new rock climbs and alpine routes.

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The New River Rendezvous Recap

Jun. 11th 2013

Touted as one the best, if not the best, fund-raising climbing festivals in the Southeast is the New River Rendezvous (aka The ‘Vous) and this year attendees, volunteers, and SCARPA athletes all agree – it’s one for the books.

Bouldering at The ‘Vous

Put on by the New River Alliance of Climbers and a handful of volunteers from the surrounding New River Gorge area, the event attracted about 800 attendees and raised $20,000 to be used for park restoration, facility improvements and trail work.

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Mercedes Pollmeier Helps Climbers Get in Shape for Spring

Mar. 8th 2013

Mercedes Pollmeier was one of four featured trainers in the February issue Climbing Magazine’s article, “New workouts to refresh your gym training and guarantee spring sends.” A strength and conditioning coach and the fitness director at Vertical World in Seattle, Pollmeier’s conditioning workouts focus on staying balanced, strong and healthy as a climber. She knows what muscles are overdeveloped and which ones might need a little attention. Pollmeier gives us a few tips, talks about using the gym to stay in shape for outdoor climbing, and discusses the ebb and flow of the seasons for year-round climbers. She has also created a training video with a few of her favorite exercises. Read more tips from Mercedes Pollmeier on Climbing.com here: http://bit.ly/13Jypab or on her blog, GirlBeta.com.

In the winter, it’s tough to get outside and climb, but it also gets boring to constantly climb in the gym. This is the case for me anyways. I have never been able to climb more than 2-3 times a week inside a gym. So, to stay strong during the winter, I like to cross train with resistance training, weight lifting, and intervals. I also use the campus board to develop my finger strength. I increase my conditioning training during the winter-spring (essentially October-April) and climb more during the summer and fall. This goes well with a standard strength and conditioning protocol that most athletes cycle through, so that they don’t get burned out or injured.

I use the same methods and programs to train my athletes as I use to train myself.  In the winter and spring, the focus is on general conditioning, climbing endurance, climbing strength endurance, and finger and hand strength. In the summer and fall, we drop the amount of conditioning (but it still continues) and focus on climbing technique and power.

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Just Getting Started: Q&A with Andy Raether

Jun. 5th 2012

Self-motivation has been a virtue of Andy Raether since his Minnesotan adolescence. Fostered by active parents, his drive has been to give it all and pursue his passions with authenticity and genuine desire. The world-class sport climber has reaped the rewards of climbing through rigorous training, and the personal satisfaction and accomplishment that comes with it. Currently he lives in Las Vegas, Nevada, exploring his adopted Red Rocks and Mt. Charleston climbing meccas. The SCARPA athlete says he’s in the best shape of his life, and looks forward not only to climbing but building his own business with his girlfriend and partner Kim.

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Heinz Mariacher and Active Randing in SCARPA rock shoes

Jul. 22nd 2011

“The concept is as easy as nailing a piece of rubber to a barn door,” says Heinz Mariacher, SCARPA’s storied shoe designing prophet, or – more formally – climbing line manager.

But don’t let his casual theorizing about what he calls ‘Active Randing’ fool you. There’s more going on than Mariacher would lead you to believe. After all, the guy’s had a one-track focus on climbing shoes for well over three decades.

So what is Active Randing? And what difference does it make in SCARPA’s rock shoes?

Said (somewhat) simply, Mariacher’s concept of Active Randing employs rubber rands that wrap around the shoe in different configurations (for different types of climbing), designed to support climbers’ feet in the movements critical to climbing at top levels. These active rands are tensioned in ways that engage and disengage to support the foot, storing and re-releasing energy. They dynamically adapt to the foot while it loads and unloads body weight, effectively storing and releasing power—similar to the way a barn door slams shut with a rubber tether.

Visually, you can see it SCARPA’s rock shoes. If you look at, say, a Vapor V or an Instinct, the shoes have structure that makes them look like there’s a foot in them when there isn’t. Active rands give the shoe that structure. They also do a lot more that you can’t see, but you can feel …

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Don’t judge the shoe by its … uh … assymetric downturn

Sep. 16th 2010

If you are climbing hard routes these days, downturned shoes are most likely what you’re in.

If you’re perhaps a little on the old-school side and/or you’re just used to using more comfortable shoes, it can be hard to see the light first time you pull on a pair of more assymetrical, downturned shoes, like SCARPA’s Vapor V. Especially if you judge them from this one experience … One might even conclude you only benefit from such shoes if you are climbing super steep, super hard terrain.

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