Scarpa North America Blog

Tag Archives: trad climbing

The Best Climbing Gear for Trad and Alpine Routes

Jun. 24th 2015

Last August, SCARPA athlete Shingo Ohkawa spent month in search of first descents on the classic vertical walls of Wyoming’s spectacular Wind River Range. While he and his partners horsepacked in to base camp, it was all human-powered effort from there. Long days on approach and even longer days in a harness and climbing shoes allowed Shingo to really abuse the best SCARPA has to offer for this style of climbing. While an unseasonably wet and cold August shut them out of many of his objectives, he still came back with some glowing reviews. These are the SCARPA shoes that got him too the wall and up it, including an FA on the West Face of Helen’s Tower 1.

Wind River Range Vista
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9 Tips for Multipitch Climbing

Jun. 19th 2014

Sarah Hueniken is one of only 10 women who are ACMG-certified rock and alpine guides in Canada. As a NOLS instructor and a private guide, Sarah has a number of first ascents under her belt, and has competed in many ice and mixed competitions. To add to this month’s theme of trad climbing, Sarah wrote out nine tips for SCARPA fans to follow when multipitch climbing.

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How To Be A Better Trad Climber

Jun. 17th 2014

Topher Donahue, one of the world’s most experienced trad climbers, is running a new trad coaching program in collaboration with the Colorado Mountain School for beginner through advanced leaders. He volunteered to help SCARPA readers make it to their next level in trad climbing.

Do you ever think, “What do I need to do to be a better trad climber?”

Check out SCARPA’s Techno X and Techno X Women’s for your next trad climbing trip.

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Techno-cal Climbing In The North Cascades

Jun. 10th 2014

Seasoned climber and writer Blake Herrington took time to tell us about his experiences climbing at Washington Pass and what the area means to him.

I was a 19-year-old student when I first climbed at Washington Pass, an area of steep granite spires in Washington’s North Cascades. I was carless and had found a partner (primary qualification: own a car) through a climbing website. I remember fretting over potential temperatures and snow conditions, and I still recall the first route I did – an 800-foot 5.8 on the highest spire in the Liberty Bell group. I repeated this route, with some 5.10 variations, as a “date” with my now wife, Allison. In the last nine years I have climbed abroad and returned to Washington Pass dozens of times, banking up a list of memories, completing new routes, and bailing amid dead ends and storms. I’ve learned about my abilities and my skills as a partner, making Washington Pass a great yardstick to return to and measure myself against.

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